16 “Do’s” and “Do NOTs” To Avoid Getting Deactivated On Uber (& How to Get Reactivated)

As with most things touched by smartphones and social media, ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft are becoming ubiquitous, especially in major metropolitan areas. They’re a great way for drivers to make extra money and have a bit more autonomy over their workdays, while giving all kinds of people safe and easy transportation.

As a means to customer security as well as profit for their own company, Uber has a rather high standard for drivers, and with it the real possibility of deactivation (inability to receive ride requests through a suspended driver account) if drivers commit certain infractions. Uber has faced some controversy on this point, as until April of this year its deactivation policy was vague and incomplete.

This list will be your guide to what to do—and not do—to prevent getting your Uber driver account deactivated.

HyreCar commercial

Do: Drive safely

This one is so obvious it shouldn’t be mentioned. But for clarity’s sake: If you drive like a maniac or under the influence of any drugs or alcohol, not only are you breaking the law but your Uber passenger will report you to the company.

Riders expect a safe, event-free ride to wherever they’re going. Driving erratically or while intoxicated is a one-way ticket to deactivation, and likely a complete ban from the company.

 

Don’t: Be a jerk

Besides driving under the influence, harassing, molesting, or verbally abusing your riders is a huge no-no. Most Uber drivers are perfectly nice people looking to make some extra money, and most riders are just looking for a lift, but if you’re having a bad day or the customer says something to irritate you, be very careful and wise about how you handle it.

This also goes for making unwanted sexual advances to attractive customers or making otherwise inappropriate, lewd, crude or threatening comments. The customer will report it and there will be consequences.

 

Do: Drive frequently

This one’s a bit different. One of the appeals of Uber is that it allows the driver to set his or her own hours, giving them a certain amount of freedom over their schedule. But it also requires a fair level of commitment, as drivers who don’t accept rides for long periods risk deactivation for inactivity.

This is simple to resolve, however; just email Uber customer support and ask to be reactivated. Whether you have been deactivated or just to prevent it, a good rule of thumb is to drive at least once a month.

 

Don’t: Cancel (too often)

Uber assumes you’re working for them because (a) you want to make money and (b) do so by driving strangers to various places around your city. As such, canceling accepted ride requests too frequently creates a hassle for customers, other drivers—and you, if Uber catches on.

The company says excellent drivers have a cancellation rate below five percent. Each city has a maximum cancellation rate, which is calculated by the average cancellation numbers of the Uber drivers there. If your cancellations go above that line, you could be temporarily blocked from the app and if it continues you could be deactivated.

DON’T Cancel Too Many Rides.

 

Do: Keep your ratings high

Uber is famous for allowing both drivers and riders to rate each other after the ride is completed. Uber expects high approval ratings for its drivers. Because your rating is calculated based on the average ratings of your last 500 rides (or your total rides if you’re at less than 500), a consistently low rating will set off red flags at Uber HQ.

You will risk deactivation if your rating goes below 4.6. The good news is if this does happen, you can take a customer service course for less than $100 to get a second chance.

 

Don’t: Abuse guaranteed pay hours

Traditionally, Uber gave people who successfully signed up an immediate $500 bonus. In 2016, they began to change this policy and instead offer “guaranteed pay” to drivers who accepted a certain number of rides during certain high-use blocs of time, which differed depending on the city.

Because of this guaranteed income, some drivers began using their friends, family members or even their own transportation to count towards the minimum ride number, instead of actually accepting requests from strangers. Occasionally driving a friend or family member during these bloc periods won’t set off alarms, but doing it a lot will look suspicious and could result in consequences.

 

Do: Keep documentation current

Part of security is ensuring drivers are legally able to drive—which most basically assumes all their important documents, like registration, insurance, vehicle inspection, and license are up-to-date. Drivers are expected to keep these documents current, especially the ones with time limits like licenses.

Having these documents renewed and uploaded to Uber at least a week before expiration is the easiest and most timely way to avoid this kind of deactivation. Be aware that these kinds of deactivation, though easily fixed, are swift and frequently without notice, as it’s your responsibility to keep your information up-to-date.

uber-paperwork

 

Don’t: Game the system

With technology, there are all sorts of ways one can rip off the company. Uber takes fraud very seriously, and cheap attempts to game them are various and sundry: Accepting hails (like a taxi service), provoking a rider to cancel, accepting a drive with no intention to complete, falsifying or deliberately extending the time or distance of a trip, creating false accounts to increase fares, claiming fraudulent fees or charges (like cleaning), and intentionally accepting falsified or fraudulent trips (such as a rider using a stolen or illegitimately obtained free ride code). All of these things can result in deactivation, usually permanently.

 

Do: Use the right car

Sometimes an Uber driver wants to use more than one car for their services. This is perfectly acceptable as long as the car is safe to drive (proper registration, insurance, etc.), and the car is registered to your Uber account.

Often, an Uber driver will use more than one car when the car they pick up rides in is not always the one listed on the account. Riders will be understandably put off and confused when the car they requested is not the one trying to get their attention, and drivers have sometimes been reported for this. Make sure to have all the cars used registered with your account and you’re good to go.

 

Don’t: Drive with someone else

This is an unusual one but understandable: Some drivers are wary about accepting rides from strangers, and prefer having another adult in the car with them while driving.

This is absolutely against company policy and under no circumstances is it permitted. Customers tend to report these kinds of things (or worse, have given rides to Uber employees while having another person in the car), and if so you will face immediate deactivation.

 

Do: Pass your background check

In some cities, Uber is requiring a far more stringent and difficult-to-pass background check, for both new and veteran drivers. Some have been driving with Uber successfully for a long time and then are dropped because they fail the newer requirements.

There isn’t much that can be done about this, other than maintaining a clean record even after you become a driver, or if you move to a city where the requirements aren’t as strict.

Uber Legal Requirements

 

Don’t: Discriminate

Uber has a stringent policy against discrimination, and drivers will face permanent deactivation for refusing rides to people based on anything protected under “relevant federal, state, or local law,” including race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status, etc.

Understandably, not all cars are equipped to be easily accessible or safe for riders with disabilities; Uber is happy to work with drivers to make their cars as accessible as possible.

 

Do: Watch your mouth (and keyboard)

Both keyboard and tongue can be potential sources of deactivation for Uber drivers. Besides refraining from highly negative, unkind, offensive, or harassing speech while with passengers, it is also a good idea to be careful about what you say about Uber on social media.

While uncommon, Uber has been known to retaliate against drivers who criticize them on Twitter or Facebook. Assume anyone can read what you say and act accordingly.

 

Don’t: Go outside the system

Uber’s ride system is well-regulated and designed to ensure both safety and efficiency for all who partake in it. Additionally, Uber is the brainchild of particular individuals and thus the logos and other intellectual property are trademarked.

As such, doing things like accepting anonymous rides, accepting illegal street hails, using any of Uber’s logos or intellectual property, harming the Uber brand by violating the drivers’ agreement, or accepting payment outside of the app are all grounds for deactivation.

 

Don’t: Hide your identity

Besides the normal requirements to keep documentation current, Uber drivers are also expected to use their real names, identifiable and clear profile pictures, and provide other accurate identifying and other information to Uber.

If this information is falsified or otherwise questionable, it creates an unsafe and confusing atmosphere for riders and Uber will take appropriate action. Additionally, allowing someone else to use your Uber account to accept rides in your behalf, or using an unregistered vehicle, is also prohibited.

 

Don’t: Get a ticket

This falls under the “safe driving” umbrella, but deserves its own mention: Because Uber expects a safe driving experience for its riders, any behavior that violates traffic laws (whether state or local) will be grounds for deactivation. Obviously, this includes your driving record while not using Uber, but be especially careful to obey all traffic laws while actually using the app.

Drivers who get pulled over by a cop for speeding erratic driving—or worse, engage in “serious illegal activity” or become party to it—while on an Uber ride will face immediate deactivation.

Uber Driver Police Ticket

 

If you get deactivated, here’s how to get reactivated…

The possibility of and steps to reactivation differ depending on why a driver’s account is suspended.

  • In cases of expired documentation, drivers can simply contact Uber and give them updated information.
  • Accounts suspended due to inactivity can be reinstated by contacting Uber and requesting it; just be sure to actually drive every month.
  • Low ratings cancellations and others due to poor quality can potentially be reversed by taking a quality improvement course offered in most major cities for a fee (Uber will eventually make the course available entirely online so drivers everywhere can partake as needed).

Because not all deactivations come with warning or explanation, you will have to contact Uber to find out the particulars of your case and what if anything can be done to reverse it. This may be an involved process, so be sure to be patient, courteous, and respectful, even if you feel your questions aren’t being answered or you’re not being helped. Just politely persist in asking for clarity.

Drivers whose accounts are canceled due to serious passenger complaints or grave violations of policy will not be reactivated.

uber-reactivation-steps

 

Conclusion

Uber is a great way for good drivers with free time to make extra cash and be of service to their communities. The basic idea here is the same as any on-the-road interaction, or any engagement with other people: Drive safely and responsibly. Be courteous. Be kind. Do that, and not only will you have a great driver rating, but you’ll have the confidence that comes from knowing you’re a good person, too.

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By | 2018-10-09T14:56:57+00:00 November 15th, 2016|Blog, Driver|22 Comments

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22 Comments

  1. Drastic ds emulator April 17, 2017 at 11:53 am - Reply

    This article is really a nice one it assists new net visitors, who are wishing in favor
    of blogging.

    • Nate Ryan April 26, 2017 at 9:33 pm - Reply

      Thanks, that’s what we are aiming for!

  2. zeeshan August 16, 2017 at 4:14 am - Reply

    its unfair to permenently deactivated just because of rating system its should be some spacific period like one year or six months

  3. Shirley Anderson August 18, 2017 at 5:32 pm - Reply

    They said I was doing fradulent activity how I was never email my phone was stolen I have a clean background never been jail please let me Know how can I be reactivated

    • HyreCar August 21, 2017 at 5:47 pm - Reply

      Hey Shirley, we are unable to locate you in our system, with what email or phone number did you sign up with?

    • Kathy Yarbrough December 9, 2017 at 6:34 pm - Reply

      It takes Uber a couple of weeks just to get your ins information updated. I am not the only one that knows this. They are slow and a lot of times the foreign people working there don’t un understand what you are saying/e-mailing .

  4. Brenda pease August 28, 2017 at 2:04 am - Reply

    Hi, is it ok to let people on facebook know that im a driver when they are coming to my city and state ?

    • HyreCar August 29, 2017 at 5:11 pm - Reply

      Please clarify your question.

  5. Jonathan September 4, 2017 at 5:23 pm - Reply

    To Shirley’s question about being deactivated for fraud, this explains how sometimes Uber thinks you’re committing some kind of fraud when you’re really not. https://www.ridester.com/uber-account-disabled/

    Maybe it’ll help, Shirley!

    • Seth September 8, 2017 at 9:01 pm - Reply

      Helpful link to address most information, but I think she may be referring to if it’s legal, as in sometimes it’s illegal for Uber to come into a city. I know some drivers in Chicago, when Lyft and Uber first came to town, didn’t advertise that they were drivers since the city would fine them.

  6. bbbb October 2, 2017 at 2:21 pm - Reply

    Is there a fair hearing from Uber drivers against reports made by riders, before actions are taking by uber

    • Reese Moulton October 2, 2017 at 4:14 pm - Reply

      Yes, but of course it will depend on the severity of the report and the case at hand.

  7. Sardar Muddassir October 21, 2017 at 11:51 am - Reply

    My driver id is blocked. I am working in Pakistan but my id is blocked from America on customer complain. I started working just 2 days ago and it was just a misunderstanding about fare. Kindly sort out this issue. My id is hs1.isb@gmail.com. what should I di. Kindly give fair suggestions.

    • Reese Moulton October 23, 2017 at 7:44 pm - Reply

      If you are cleared to drive for Uber and/or Lyft, we can help you get into a vehicle so you can start making money! We suggest you apply to drive for both companies. Once you clear the background check with them, please visit driver.hyrecar.com to create a driver account with us and then you will be able to select a vehicle to book so you can start making cash!

  8. […] on all of their drivers, so you’ll want to maintain your clean driving record to avoid being deactivated. They may also conduct background checks if your area has law changes that necessitate […]

  9. Leo McNeill December 8, 2017 at 8:50 pm - Reply

    Hi…
    My name is Leo McNeill And I was deactivated and accused of making someone uncomfortable they said that I had 3 accounts Of this Matter.
    But each time I asked him what did the customers say they wouldn’t tell me I don’t have an idea of what was said because I don’t have them type of conversations with my customers but nobody can prove it but yet and still I was deactivated…
    What can I do to have my account reactivated

  10. […] there you go! Assuming you’ve been doing everything else correctly, next time you’re in need of assistance, hopefully one of these resources will work for you when […]

  11. Yvonne Murphy March 7, 2018 at 12:34 am - Reply

    My son moved from Louisvilke, KY. He drove Uber there. He moved to Boise, ID a year ago. I had put him on my insurance for a few months. He got his own insurance again, background check, car up to standard. New license. They have yetv to let him drive. It just keeps saying he cannot drive here because they still have him in Louisville, KY.

    • Aidan McKevitt March 7, 2018 at 8:09 pm - Reply

      I’m sorry to hear that happened to him! The best plan of action to take with that would be to try and talk with uber directly through their helpline here, https://help.uber.com/

  12. Richard April 18, 2018 at 11:41 am - Reply

    Permanently Deactivated: Lyft accused me of asking for cash, in their TOS it sates “Cash tips are okay”. I have an unlabeled jar hanging in the back seat with nothing on it. This is plain unfair.

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